Propionate liver

The normal inflammatory response to local infections can be masked by halobetasol. Application of topical corticosteroids to areas of infection, including tuberculosis of the skin, dermatologic fungal infection, and cutaneous or systemic viral infection (., measles or varicella), should be initiated or continued only if the appropriate antiinfective treatment is instituted. Herpes infection may be transmitted to other sites, including the eye. If the infection does not respond to the antimicrobial therapy, the concurrent use of the topical corticosteroid should be discontinued until the infection is controlled. Topical corticosteroids may delay the healing of non-infected wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers.

Propionic acidemia occasionally produces a toxic encephalopathy resembling Reye syndrome, indicating disruption of mitochondrial metabolism. Understanding the mitochondrial effect of propionate might clarify the pathophysiology. Liver mitochondria are inhibited by propionate (5 m m ) while muscle mitochondria are not. Preincubation is required to inhibit liver mitochondria, suggesting that propionate is metabolized to propionyl CoA. Liver and skeletal muscle mitochondria incubated with [1- 14 C]propionate contain similar quantities of matrix isotope and release comparable [ 14 C]CO 2 . However, only liver mitochondria accumulated significant propionyl CoA, which was largely (68%) synthesized from propionate. Carnitine reduced the level of liver matrix propionyl CoA. Inhibition of respiratory control ratios by propionate correlated with propionyl CoA levels. These results support the hypothesis that acyl CoA esters are toxic and that carnitine exerts its protective effect by converting acyl CoA esters to acylcarnitine esters.

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This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have:

  • An allergy to betamethasone dipropionate or any of the ingredients in the medicine
  • Skin problems such as rosacea (which affects the face), acne, dermatitis (skin inflammation) around the mouth , itching around the genitals or back passage
  • Widespread plaque psoriasis
  • A bacterial or fungal infection affecting the skin
  • Any viral skin lesions, particularly herpes simplex, or vaccination reaction to chickenpox
  • Nappy rash.

Propionate liver

propionate liver

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have:

  • An allergy to betamethasone dipropionate or any of the ingredients in the medicine
  • Skin problems such as rosacea (which affects the face), acne, dermatitis (skin inflammation) around the mouth , itching around the genitals or back passage
  • Widespread plaque psoriasis
  • A bacterial or fungal infection affecting the skin
  • Any viral skin lesions, particularly herpes simplex, or vaccination reaction to chickenpox
  • Nappy rash.

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